iradescent
afro-dominicano:

zenkitty714:

unlockaflockofwords:

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.  Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

IT GENUINELY IS NO COINCIDENCE THAT BLACK PEOPLE GET IMPRISONED WAY THE HELL MORE THAN WHITE PEOPLE. THIS IS HOW SLAVERY CARRIED THE FUCK ON.

For-profit prisons are a huge business and this is part of why. 
Also, did you know that it’s in the Constitution that people convicted of crimes can be used as slave labor? That’s another part of the Constitution that needs to be changed. 

If you changed that part of the constitution you’re essentially removing a strong leg of the prison industrial complex

afro-dominicano:

zenkitty714:

unlockaflockofwords:

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.

Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

IT GENUINELY IS NO COINCIDENCE THAT BLACK PEOPLE GET IMPRISONED WAY THE HELL MORE THAN WHITE PEOPLE. THIS IS HOW SLAVERY CARRIED THE FUCK ON.

For-profit prisons are a huge business and this is part of why. 

Also, did you know that it’s in the Constitution that people convicted of crimes can be used as slave labor? That’s another part of the Constitution that needs to be changed. 

If you changed that part of the constitution you’re essentially removing a strong leg of the prison industrial complex

kaister-azira

michaeldimotta:

Beauty and the Beast:  A Modern Day Fairy Tale.

(well modern early 2000’s)

I made this with my good friend, writer Greg Lockard, back in 2004 for the online daily comic, Young Bottoms In Love. I think it was the first story I created after graduating from college in 2003, so you’ll have to excuse the rough line work and the dated Queer Eye for the Straight Guy reference. I still think it’s a cute though, enjoy!

iradescent

critink:

Up in the rice terraces of the Cordillera mountain range of the Philippines live the last few tattooed women of Kalinga. Traditional tattooing is seen as archaic and painful by the younger generations of Kalingas. As an Indigenous group that has successfully fought against colonizing forces, it is losing the practice of traditional tattooing because of the changing perspective of beauty and interpretations of the practice by outside scholars.

Studies on the tradition interpreted the practice to show that men were given tattoos because of brave acts during tribal wars while the women were given tattoos just to decorate their bodies. Men who attempt to get traditional tattoos without acts of bravery are shunned by the community and are now unable to continue the practice without facing criminal charges from the government. Women are unconstrained by the same reasons but are struggling to continue the practice because of the pervasive western interpretations of aesthetics that changed the perceptions of “beauty” in Kalinga. To the women of Kalinga, the batok or the tattoo goes beyond beauty and prestige but it is symbolic of the traditional values of women’s strength and fortitude.

The traditional tattoo is an indigenous body art, an expression of the psychological dimensions of life, health, love and it defines local perceptions of existence. Sadly there is now a decline of the traditional art among indigenous women brought about by the changing perspective of the meaning of the tattoo and its stigmatized practice. It is now considered a vanishing art along with the gatekeepers of the knowledge associated with it.

The Last Tattooed Women of Kalinga by Jake Verzosa. Jake Verzosa is a freelance photographer based in Manila.

iradescent

nosferattitude:

gaywrites:

Mills College, a women’s school in Oakland, California, has just made history.

The college has adopted a written policy explicitly stating that trans women are welcome to attend the school, making it the first single-sex school in the country with such a policy.

According to school officials, between 3 and 5 of the school’s 1,000 applicants each year identify as trans or gender nonconforming; this policy will make it easier for these students to apply and attend, should they so choose. The first students for whom the new policy applies will begin their classes this coming spring semester. 

“When people can be authentically who they are — that’s who Mills is,” said Mills senior Tess Fillbeck-Bates.

“This is really just a codification of our practice for several years,” said Brian O’Rourke, vice president for enrollment management.

This is a HUGE deal for students of all gender identities. When colleges and universities are inclusive and affirming on paper as well as in practice, it sets a standard for other schools to follow. Well done, Mills. Well done. 

Go Mills! My cousin is a librarian there. 

kissmeagainarthas

nemusou:

stabilizedinsanity:

i-am-misha****ingcollins:

23devil:

emeraldembers:

gondor-calls-for-aid:

4-1-3:

People who are younger than you but taller

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People who are younger than you but better than you at something

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People who are younger than you

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People

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Being turned into a llama

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A LLAMA?! HE’S SUPPOSED TO BE DEAD!!!

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yeah… weird

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victorywithseaandsun

vy2cool:

wethinktherefore:

bisexualfunfacts:

Fact: Unlike the gay agenda™, the bisexual agenda contains a 15 minute break for snacks between sessions.

Fact: The asexual agenda is entirely made of snacks, with a 15 minute break for all out anarchy

Fact: The pansexuals, with their extreme love for kitchen ware, make all the snacks.